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Thread: Chinese Elm, leaves not growing, no new shoots

  1. #21
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    Misting at night is not good. Only watering every two weeks will see it dead very quickly. You must check every day and water when the soil is just dry. Forget the fertiliser that often far too much.

  2. #22
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    just been reading this thread and Geoff saying this is not a good indoor plant, I just bought one of these (my 1st tree) and it said on the web site this was an indoor plant. is this wrong then or as I,m in the UK it does best indoors?

    Quote Originally Posted by geoff hobson View Post
    It is not a good species to keep indoors, you will be lucky if it lasts very long.

  3. #23
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    Chinese Elms are hardy. They will withstand -12C with no problem, I have several, and they are out always. I have tried keeping one inside (weall make mistakes) but it did not last very long. The main problem is the winter. They do not like our dry warm dull houses. The problem with sellers is they will say anything to sell trees, you are in Devon, and it is milder than where I am. There is a good nursery in Devon, well worth going to if you can and there are two societies one north one south. There is an excellent show in June in Exmouth too. I would suggest you put it outside if you can, in a sheltered spot, and it should recover. If you have a greenhouse just for a while to allow it to acclimatise as it has probably been in warm conditions too long. Get used to watering when needed, so check it every day and water when almost dry. During the winter I do not have to water much, in fact I have not watered my trees now for about 6 weeks, and may not have to for at least another 6 weeks. That is not to say if they get very dry I would not water. Have a look at www.bonsai4me.com for species guides, and Harry has written several very good books, and also look at Devon Bonsai, they are good and well worth a visit,
    Geoff.

  4. #24
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    Thanks Geoff

    I'm in Paignton/Devon so not to far from exciter and Exmouth (used to live in frome)

    I will look up them societies do they have web sites? and the Exmouth show in june,

    this is my 1st Bonsai but I have an interest in plants so may well take this up as a hobby if I get on with it ok, I only have a flat at the moment so my elm has a nice spot in the window away from any heated areas.

    watering is my main concern being winter I read they don't need to much as do most plants but my flat is really constant in temperature it don't really vary much cuz of the thick walls on this old house though saying that my larger plant does need more water being by the window then my other plants, I use a moisture meter with them but wont with my Bonsai as worried about poking about in the roots to much

    Quote Originally Posted by geoff hobson View Post
    Chinese Elms are hardy. They will withstand -12C with no problem, I have several, and they are out always. I have tried keeping one inside (weall make mistakes) but it did not last very long. The main problem is the winter. They do not like our dry warm dull houses. The problem with sellers is they will say anything to sell trees, you are in Devon, and it is milder than where I am. There is a good nursery in Devon, well worth going to if you can and there are two societies one north one south. There is an excellent show in June in Exmouth too. I would suggest you put it outside if you can, in a sheltered spot, and it should recover. If you have a greenhouse just for a while to allow it to acclimatise as it has probably been in warm conditions too long. Get used to watering when needed, so check it every day and water when almost dry. During the winter I do not have to water much, in fact I have not watered my trees now for about 6 weeks, and may not have to for at least another 6 weeks. That is not to say if they get very dry I would not water. Have a look at www.bonsai4me.com for species guides, and Harry has written several very good books, and also look at Devon Bonsai, they are good and well worth a visit,
    Geoff.

  5. #25
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    Ok, fine then you need to keep it as cool as you can during winter. You have to get used to checking I use a chopstick and if it comes out clean then water. Check every day and only water when needed not to a schedule. I think South Devon meets in Exeter not sure where, if you have a look on the FOBBS web site you will find a link. Forget what you have read and do what the plant tells you, when you water make sure it is thorough and not a dribble. Forget fertiliser at this time of year, and I would think about re potting in the spring. You need to get it back to health and growing, not easy at this time of year, but it will soon be spring. Hopefully, you will find that leaves drop but then buds will come also,
    Geoff.

  6. #26
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    2016-12-18_122622.jpg

    Heres my one its not lost to many leaves yet
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #27
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    Looks very good, you are quite lucky to get a decent tree, now the trick is to keep it through the winter,
    Geoff.

  8. #28
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    To update on my tree, in February it began dropping leaves. I've noticed that it goes through cycles as an indoor tree where its obviously growing and then not so much. This time the "not so much" phase was pretty dramatic, eventually dropping all but eight leaves. In early April, I saw the beginnings of buds coming up everywhere but then they stopped growing and darkened. I continued to water as the soil dried and kept it in the sun, but alas, nothing. Figuring I had to go to drastic measures to save this tree, I decided to repot it, and prune it. The nursery soil it has been in since I got it has held on to moisture unevenly. Using bonsai mixture that allows for drainage, I carefully repotted. Then I pruned it hoping that it would be easier for the energy in the trunk if it didn't have as far to go. May 7 I started seeing new buds everywhere and today it is beautiful again. One great thing about repotting is that I know how deep the roots are and where they are located, making it easier to target the root system. I hope that helps someone.

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