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Thread: some questions from a beginner :)

  1. #1
    Bonsai Apprentice Fady Mohareb's Avatar
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    some questions from a beginner :)

    hello

    i am new at bonsai art

    i read alot of articls about the art of bonsai and how to make a bonsai tree

    but i still have some questions

    how the tree still small is that by cutting the roots and the main root for the tree ?

    what is the roots that need to be cut after move it to the bonsai pots ?

    thx alot

    Fady

  2. #2
    Super Moderator iamurthman's Avatar
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    Hi Fady and welcome to the forums!

    It is a very broad question concerning the roots of a tree. You must be more specific as to what type of tree, how old it is, and very important where you and tree are. We are glad to help, but we need to know more.
    Sincerly, Rick

  3. #3
    Bonsai Apprentice Fady Mohareb's Avatar
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    hello sir

    the type of the tree is Redleaf Maple and i will start it from zero from seeds

    i know it will take long time to grow and to be able to make it a bonsai tree

    but i want to start my future bonsai tree from zero to the birth

    i am from Egypt where the weather is normally at winter from 9c to 25 c and in summer from 25c to 40c degree

    so what is your opinion sir

    thx alot
    Last edited by iamurthman; 02-11-2013 at 08:09 PM.
    love every thing green

  4. #4
    Super Moderator iamurthman's Avatar
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    Hi Fady,

    Well, we've narrowed it down to a Redleaf Maple, started from seed, in Egypt. Man, I just don't picture maples when I think of Egypt! Do they grow there? I mean, do you see maples around town in the landscaping? Do they sell maples there for planting in yard or garden?

    The temps you give seem to support maples, although the winter temps are a bit warm by a few degrees, they prefer 45F or less for about six weeks. They are quite hardy on that end and in many regions remain frozen all winter. Maples leaf is very sensitive to excessive heat and direct sun in the summer. You're really pushing the limits of this tree.

    I think you should look into what types of trees grow where you live and chose one of those to explore as a bonsai subject. A more experienced gardener/bonsaist could maybe pull off a maple in Egypt, but it is best to start off with something that does well in your climate and work your way into more difficult species.
    Sincerly, Rick

  5. #5
    Bonsai Apprentice Fady Mohareb's Avatar
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    thx sir for your attention

    i have ordered about six tybe of seed to make a bonsai tree :
    Redleaf Maple

    urkzaninov's Hornbeam

    Japanese Maple

    Amur Maple

    Indian Banyan

    Japanese Yew

    so what is the best one of that seed to plant in Egypt


    all tybe of trees here in Egypt not beautiful as this maples


    thx alot sir
    love every thing green

  6. #6
    Super Moderator iamurthman's Avatar
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    Hi Fady,
    Most of these trees are temperate climate trees and will not do well without a substantial winter condition. You should be looking into tropical/subtropical types of trees. The banyan is a good choice as is any type of Ficus. Sycamore ficus is native to Egypt as is mulberry trees. Egypt is a big place, so depending where in Egypt makes a big difference. Along the Nile or the Mediterranean coast, or out in the desert? It's like me saying I'm in the USA. What does that tell you? It's a big place, right? I'm in the southwestern corner of the state of Oregon, USA, nestled in the foothills on the western slope of the Cascade Mts.

    Ok, all joking aside, I would be looking for tropical/subtropical types of trees. There are many fine varieties in this catagory. There are many trees that I can not (under normal conditions) grow here. The desire to keep trees of this type anyway is commonly referred to as 'Zone Envy', ie. I wish I could grow tropicals here. Point is you have to go with what grows in your zone.

    I do keep a few Jade Trees and ficus and a handful of coffee trees. All of these trees must be brought indoors for the winter when the temps get below 50F-60F. The jades (Crassula o.) do well, but the ficus have a difficult time of it and are happy to get back outdoors when the weather warms past danger of frost. I accept these difficulties and make proper arrangements for the trees to over winter.

    The major difficulty with the trees you have chosen is their need for a substancial winter dormancy period. It is not that hard to keep trees warm in the winter here, but you will need to keep yours cold, and that is more difficult to recreate. I do not think you are ready to attempt this tpye of growing. Be content to work with what grows well where you are and you will find much enjoyment in the art of bonsai.

    Sincerly, Rick

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